Review: The Elite by Kiera Cass

The Selection began with thirty-five girls.
Now with the group narrowed down to the six Elite, the competition to win Prince Maxon's heart is fiercer than ever—and America is still struggling to decide where her heart truly lies. Is it with Maxon, who could make her life a fairy tale? Or with her first love, Aspen?

America is desperate for more time. But the rest of the Elite know exactly what they want—and America's chance to choose is about to slip away.

Release: April 23, 2013
Heroine POV - 1st person
Book 2 of The Selection series
Format: paperback purchase

My review of book 1 - The Selection


★★★☆☆

Love is beautiful fear.

I'm still loving this story, so that's something. I think the most interesting parts of it are the rebels and the ways that they fit into everything. Not only were America's views on the entire selection process changing, but so were Maxon's. The prince was seeing exactly what the caste system was doing to his people and he was willing to do things to make a change. Unfortunately, America, again thinking she knows everything, almost sabotaged everything, infuriating the King and everyone else. Will this girl every freaking get real?!

Here she is after a rebel attack at the palace:

Typically, the worst of the mess was gone by the time we were released from the safe room. This time, however, it looked like there had been too much for the staff to get to, and we would have been down there all day. Still, I wished they'd tried a little harder.


Does she remember that she was born one caste above a servant? Has being in the palace elevated her to a three and changed her morals and principles? Her internal musings were more suited to Celeste than anyone else and the fact that that was what she was thinking was one more reason I couldn't stand her.

Okay, so if I'm being totally honest here, I loved the story but strongly disliked America for most of this story. Was I surprised? Absolutely not. She doesn't exactly evoke the warm and fuzzies when I think of her. Here's what she made me feel...
✦ so all the girls are given the chance to choose a philanthropic project because it's something the future princess would be responsible for. All of the other girls were busy doing research and getting their ish together. Not America. She fluctuated between self-flagellation and looking for everyone else to do it for her. She expected every man in her life to give her the answer. Aspen, Maxon, and even a long dead man. And when they didn't help her, when Maxon didn't bend over backwards for her, she did something she absolutely knew was wrong, just because she was angry. Not because she was a hero, but because she was a petty itch. ➝➝see next point
✦ I strongly disliked her for the majority of the book. Literally until page 271. She initially spoke out against the caste system as a way of lashing out, but it became pretty obvious, especially considering how passionate she was about it, that she was not only becoming brave but also becoming a hero for the undesirables. It was when I felt my heart thaw for her. My hatred started to dissolve. Although her reasons for doing it stemmed from her irrational feelings of hurt, betrayal, and disillusionment, it didn't diminish the truth of her words. And once I considered her sentiments genuine, the why of it all didn't seem to matter.
✦ Although I started to actually like America, I can't say that I hated when she was told off by both the King and Maxon. IN THE SAME CHAPTER!! Hilarious!! It wasn't like they were lying to the poor girl. They attacked her with the truth and Maxon happened to call her out on all of the stupid ish she's been doing from the start. I just 👏👏👏 for my boy! #TeamMaxon all the way

So yeah, by the end I kinda liked America, but who really cares? It was all about Marlee for me. There was a pivotal scene for her and it broke my heart and gave me chills and had me cheering for her even harder than ever. That girl more than deserves a happy ending of her very own and I truly hope she gets it.

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